Recipes

Looking to make your own Blenderized Recipes at home?

Click on Getting Started Getting Started for guidelines to review with your healthcare professional to make sure the blenderized options below are right for you or your loved one. You can make as a nutritious base, or use to make them from scratch. Your healthcare professional can provide specific and individualized guidance on nutrients required each day.

Getting Started

Always work with a registered dietitian nutritionist or other healthcare professional to choose or create recipes that fit your or your loved one’s specific nutritional needs, food preferences, and food allergies or intolerances. For some medical conditions, a homemade tube feeding may not be advised. Go to

Blenderized tube feedings are most appropriate for those 1 year or older. If the child is born premature, the adjusted or corrected age must be 1 year or older. In addition, the person you are blending for should:

  • be medically stable and cleared by the health care provider to begin a new feeding regimen.
  • be able to tolerate a bolus feeding.
  • have a 14 Fr or larger gastrostomy tube and a well-healed mature tube site (stoma).
  • have a registered dietitian or other healthcare professional available for oversight, including recipe modification, calorie goals, monitoring, and troubleshooting, when needed.

A few other important tips before you start blending at home:

  • Do whatever works for you and your family.
  • Homemade blenderized feedings can be 100% of the tube feeding regimen, or used in conjunction with formula.
  • Even the most committed patient caregiver needs a back up plan for times when preparing a homemade blenderized formula are not possible (illness, travel, etc.). If you cannot have a week or more of pre-prepared feeding in the freezer, talk to your health care professional about a food-based commercial tube feeding formula that would be appropriate for these situations.
  • What do you need to get started?

    • A 14 Fr or larger gastrostomy tube and a well-healed mature tube site (stoma).
    • 60 mL catheter tip syringes.
    • Ability to tolerate a bolus feeding.
    • Ability to deliver a bolus feeding as pressure is needed to push the formula through the syringe.
    • High-speed blender that can completely liquefy solid food.
    • Nonporous containers with tight fitting lids for storage.

    Kitchen Tips

    • Use safe kitchen and food handling practices.
    • Wash hands for 20 seconds with soap and warm water.
    • Wash cutting boards, dishes, utensils, equipment, and counter tops with hot, soapy water after preparing each food item and before you go on to the next item.
    • Avoid cross contaminating foods. Use a separate cutting board and knives for fresh produce and another cutting board and knives for raw meat, poultry, or seafood.
    • Use separate plates and utensils for raw and cooked foods

    Preparation Tips

    • A high-speed blender is recommended as blenders as they can completely liquefy solid food into a smooth consistency. Compared to regular blenders, they are better at blending tough leafy green foods and stringy foods.
    • Blend until mixture is completely smooth and liquefied--no chunks or pieces of food should be present.
    • If any chunks or pieces of food remain, blend a little longer.
    • If needed, strain to remove any remaining pieces of food.
    • Water may need to be added to help blend the recipe to a smooth consistency, but remember this will add to the overall volume that has to be fed each day.

    Feeding Tips

    • Bolus feeding with a syringe works best and provides the pressure needed to administer a homemade formula through the feeding tube.
    • To prevent clogging and for ease of administration, a 14-French gastrostomy tube is best; smaller tubes are more likely to clog.
    • Use a 60 mL syringe to administer the prescribed amount of feeding over 15 to 45 minutes.
    • Administer the feeding at room temperature.
    • Feedings can be held for up to 2 hours at room temperature. Discard unused feeding after 2 hours.
    • Remember to flush the feeding tube with water before and after each feeding. Water is essential for hydration, bowel function, skin integrity, urine production, and many other body functions.

    Getting Started Tips

    • Before starting or switching to a homemade tube feeding regimen, consult with your health care professional to make sure it is right for you or your loved one.
    • The decision should be based on yours's or your loved one’s unique needs.
    • If you are already using a commercial tube feeding formula, but want to start using a homemade blenderized formula, work closely with your healthcare provider to determine the best transition plan. Some options include:
    • Start by replacing 1 to 2 bolus (syringe) feedings with the homemade blenderized recipe, but continue to provide the current formula for the remaining feedings or overnight, if a pump is available. Try this for 1-2 weeks prior to transition to 100% homemade blenderized feedings.
    • Transition slowly over one week. Give one quarter of the recipe for a few days, then one half, and then all of the blenderized recipe by the end of one week. If there is any intolerance, wait an extra day or two before increasing the volume of the blenderized feeding.
    • If adding any foods that have never been tried before, introduce one new food at a time, and wait three days before adding another new food.

    Storage Tips

    • Keep foods at proper temperatures: 40° F or below for refrigerator and 0° F or below for freezer.
    • Cover and store unused blenderized tube feeding in an air tight, nonporous (i.e. glass) container with a tight fitting lid in the refrigerator for up to 24 hours. If not refrigerated, discard formula after 2 hours.
    • If making multiple servings at once, divide the batch of homemade formula into individual servings. Store in tightly covered nonporous containers in the refrigerator for up to 24 hours.
    • If preparing feedings in advance that will not be used for 24 hours-48 hours, place in the freezer immediately in airtight, nonporous containers. When thawing, thaw in the refrigerator, not on the counter.
    • To warm a feeding that has been refrigerated, run the container under warm water. Avoid microwave heating as microwaves can heat unevenly.
    • If using formula as part of the recipe, or as part of the daily or weekly meal plan, store unopened cartons or pouches of formula at room temperature. Do not store near a heat source and do not freeze.
    • Cover and store opened cartons or pouches of formula in the refrigerator for up to 24 hours. Do not freeze.

    Getting Started

    Use under
    Medical Supervision

    Always work with a registered dietitian nutritionist or other healthcare professional to choose or create recipes that fit your or your loved one’s specific nutritional needs, food preferences, and food allergies or intolerances. For some medical conditions, a homemade tube feeding may not be advised. Go to for important guidelines to review with your healthcare professional.

    Blenderized tube feedings are most appropriate for those 1 year or older. If the child is born premature, the adjusted or corrected age must be 1 year or older. In addition, the person you are blending for should:

    • be medically stable and cleared by the health care provider to begin a new feeding regimen.
    • be able to tolerate a bolus feeding.
    • have a 14 Fr or larger gastrostomy tube and a well-healed mature tube site (stoma).
    • have a registered dietitian or other healthcare professional available for oversight, including recipe modification, calorie goals, monitoring, and troubleshooting, when needed.

    A few other important tips before you start blending at home:

  • Do whatever works for you and your family.
  • Homemade blenderized feedings can be 100% of the tube feeding regimen, or used in conjunction with formula.
  • Even the most committed patient caregiver needs a back up plan for times when preparing a homemade blenderized formula are not possible (illness, travel, etc.). If you cannot have a week or more of pre-prepared feeding in the freezer, talk to your health care professional about a food-based commercial tube feeding formula that would be appropriate for these situations.
  • What do you need to get started?

    • A 14 Fr or larger gastrostomy tube and a well-healed mature tube site (stoma).
    • 60 mL catheter tip syringes.
    • Ability to tolerate a bolus feeding.
    • Ability to deliver a bolus feeding as pressure is needed to push the formula through the syringe.
    • High-speed blender that can completely liquefy solid food.
    • Nonporous containers with tight fitting lids for storage.

    Kitchen Tips

    • Use safe kitchen and food handling practices.
    • Wash hands for 20 seconds with soap and warm water.
    • Wash cutting boards, dishes, utensils, equipment, and counter tops with hot, soapy water after preparing each food item and before you go on to the next item.
    • Avoid cross contaminating foods. Use a separate cutting board and knives for fresh produce and another cutting board and knives for raw meat, poultry, or seafood.
    • Use separate plates and utensils for raw and cooked foods

    Preparation Tips

    • A high-speed blender is recommended as blenders as they can completely liquefy solid food into a smooth consistency. Compared to regular blenders, they are better at blending tough leafy green foods and stringy foods.
    • Blend until mixture is completely smooth and liquefied--no chunks or pieces of food should be present.
    • If any chunks or pieces of food remain, blend a little longer.
    • If needed, strain to remove any remaining pieces of food.
    • Water may need to be added to help blend the recipe to a smooth consistency, but remember this will add to the overall volume that has to be fed each day.

    Feeding Tips

    • Bolus feeding with a syringe works best and provides the pressure needed to administer a homemade formula through the feeding tube.
    • To prevent clogging and for ease of administration, a 14-French gastrostomy tube is best; smaller tubes are more likely to clog.
    • Use a 60 mL syringe to administer the prescribed amount of feeding over 15 to 45 minutes.
    • Administer the feeding at room temperature.
    • Feedings can be held for up to 2 hours at room temperature. Discard unused feeding after 2 hours.
    • Remember to flush the feeding tube with water before and after each feeding. Water is essential for hydration, bowel function, skin integrity, urine production, and many other body functions.

    Getting Started Tips

    • Before starting or switching to a homemade tube feeding regimen, consult with your health care professional to make sure it is right for you or your loved one.
    • The decision should be based on yours's or your loved one’s unique needs.
    • If you are already using a commercial tube feeding formula, but want to start using a homemade blenderized formula, work closely with your healthcare provider to determine the best transition plan. Some options include:
    • Start by replacing 1 to 2 bolus (syringe) feedings with the homemade blenderized recipe, but continue to provide the current formula for the remaining feedings or overnight, if a pump is available. Try this for 1-2 weeks prior to transition to 100% homemade blenderized feedings.
    • Transition slowly over one week. Give one quarter of the recipe for a few days, then one half, and then all of the blenderized recipe by the end of one week. If there is any intolerance, wait an extra day or two before increasing the volume of the blenderized feeding.
    • If adding any foods that have never been tried before, introduce one new food at a time, and wait three days before adding another new food.

    Storage Tips

    • Keep foods at proper temperatures: 40° F or below for refrigerator and 0° F or below for freezer.
    • Cover and store unused blenderized tube feeding in an air tight, nonporous (i.e. glass) container with a tight fitting lid in the refrigerator for up to 24 hours. If not refrigerated, discard formula after 2 hours.
    • If making multiple servings at once, divide the batch of homemade formula into individual servings. Store in tightly covered nonporous containers in the refrigerator for up to 24 hours.
    • If preparing feedings in advance that will not be used for 24 hours-48 hours, place in the freezer immediately in airtight, nonporous containers. When thawing, thaw in the refrigerator, not on the counter.
    • To warm a feeding that has been refrigerated, run the container under warm water. Avoid microwave heating as microwaves can heat unevenly.
    • If using formula as part of the recipe, or as part of the daily or weekly meal plan, store unopened cartons or pouches of formula at room temperature. Do not store near a heat source and do not freeze.
    • Cover and store opened cartons or pouches of formula in the refrigerator for up to 24 hours. Do not freeze.

    Recipes generated by the Blenderized Tube Feeding Recipe Builder are powered by the Blenderized Diet Recipe Calculator.  The Blenderized Diet Recipe Calculator was created by Robin Cook, M.S., R.D., C.S.P., L.D.N., and is reproduced with permission under a license from The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia.  No endorsement by CHOP or by Robin Cook, M.S., R.D., C.S.P., L.D.N., of any Nestlé Health Science brand or product is implied or intended.

    Recipe Builder

    Developed in collaboration with Robin Cook, MS, RD, CSP, LDN, a Pediatric Surgical/Trauma Dietitian at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, The Blenderized Tube Feeding Recipe Builder is specifically designed to help you create home blenderized recipes that are nutritionally complete for children 1 to 13 years. A healthcare professional should be consulted to determine how to meet daily nutrient requirements for children outside this age range.

    Recipes generated by the Blenderized Tube Feeding Recipe Builder are powered by the Blenderized Diet Recipe Calculator.  The Blenderized Diet Recipe Calculator was created by Robin Cook, MS, RD, CSP, LDN, and is reproduced with permission under a license from Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia®.  No endorsement by Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia® or by Robin Cook, MS, RD, CSP, LDN, of any Nestlé Health Science brand or product is implied or intended.